James Dunn on the Spirit —Human and Divine— in Paul of Tarsus

This is the twenty-fifth follow-up to the post, “Gagarin and the Seven Heavens“. Here, I am digressing into a series of posts on the secondary literature, for a bit, regarding πνεῦμα (“spirit”) in Paul, in the Hebrew Bible, in Stoicism, late antique Neoplatonic texts, and in some North African Christian texts from before Nicea. I may jump back and publish posts related to the main thread in between publishing the posts that are slotted for this subset.

The previous follow-up posts were becoming so numerous —and the text block listing and introducing them was so large— that they were soon going to take up more space than the posts themselves. Thus, I organized and listed them here.

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N. T. Wright on the Ascension of Jesus and Heaven

This is the twenty-fourth follow-up to the post, “Gagarin and the Seven Heavens“. Previously we focused on the former Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams. Here, we focus on an Anglican theologian from the more Evangelical side of the Anglican Church.

The previous follow-up posts were becoming so numerous —and the text block listing and introducing them was so large— that they were soon going to take up more space than the posts themselves. Thus, I organized and listed them here.

Continue reading

Rowan Williams on the Ascension of Jesus

This is the twenty-third follow-up entry to the post, “Gagarin and the Seven Heavens”; here we look at a short entry on the ascension of Jesus by Rowan Williams (published in a theological dictionary), and some homilies by the same either touching on the ascension or else delivered on or about the Feast of the Ascension.

The previous posts ranged across a number of authors at different times and places and religious affiliations, and were not organized well into any outline, so I ordered them; further, the follow-up posts were becoming so numerous, and the text block listing and briefly introducing them was so large, that they were soon going to take up more space than the posts themselves. Thus, I organized and listed them here.

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The TDNT on the God ‘Heaven’ —Οὐρανός (Ouranos, Uranus)— in Greco-Roman Myth & Art

This is the twenty-second follow-up entry to the post, “Gagarin and the Seven Heavens”. Art can tell us much; in the art of previous ages we are given an opportunity to step outside the contingent obviousnesses of our modern age (obviousnesses that we mistake for simply the way things are), and to take up another perspective, even if that vision is only partial, and even if that vision evaporates immediately when our attention is moved to other proximate things.

The previous posts were not organized well before, so I ordered them; further, they were becoming so numerous, and the text block listing and introducing them was so large, that they were soon going to take up more space than the posts themselves. Thus, I organized and listed them here. Continue reading

Angus Ritchie on the Ascension of Jesus

This is the twenty-first follow-up entry to the post, “Gagarin and the Seven Heavens”. Here, we look at one contemporary Anglican priest’s reaction to an artistic depiction of the ascension of Jesus, noted for its honesty and error.

The previous posts were not organized well before, so I ordered them; further, they were becoming so numerous, and the text block listing and introducing them was so large, that they were soon going to take up more space than the posts themselves. Thus, I organized and listed them here. Continue reading