Norman Geisler on the Ascension of Jesus

The evangelical Protestant apologist Norman Geisler died on the 1st of July, 2019. He was 86 years old. While he had a PhD in philosophy, he is not remembered for his contributions to that field, but applied his philosophical training to the defense of the school positions peculiar to the religious tribe of evangelical Protestant Christians — inerrantism of the Bible and such. I read him a little bit when I was nineteen, and promptly moved on to Pannenberg and Nietzsche. Most of Geisler strikes me as strangely preoccupied with something like sales — preconceiving the Bible to be a document that is divinely pristine and unerring (but confirming the historically specific tribal assumptions of evangelical Protestants), a document that is understood to be a foundation of truth, and vindicating it against anyone who would deny its normativity or trustworthiness (in the sense that Geisler wants it to be trustworthy). Recently, I recently came across his four-volume “Systematic Theology,” and wondered: what does he say about the ascension of Jesus? So I dug through it. Here is what I found.

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Muted

I cannot seem to translate the wordless words in my heart;

the young foals spill from their mother and walk in seconds; Continue reading

Identity Politics: Impact versus Intent, 2.75 of 4

I have written previous posts, posts about these topics. Part one is here, two is here, two (.5) is here. I also wrote about Crenshaw here.

I have changed my mind a great deal on these matters since I committed to writing about them. Here, I think about the cultural trends indicated by some of these things.

Slight spoilers, below, for the show The Expanse. Continue reading

Progress versus Novelty

I have not seen the latest iPhone but

I’m sure it will be a little bit prettier

than the one before it and

the one before that. Continue reading

James Dunn on the Spirit —Human and Divine— in Paul of Tarsus

This is the twenty-fifth follow-up to the post, “Gagarin and the Seven Heavens“. Here, I am digressing into a series of posts on the secondary literature, for a bit, regarding πνεῦμα (“spirit”) in Paul, in the Hebrew Bible, in Stoicism, late antique Neoplatonic texts, and in some North African Christian texts from before Nicea. I may jump back and publish posts related to the main thread in between publishing the posts that are slotted for this subset.

The previous follow-up posts were becoming so numerous —and the text block listing and introducing them was so large— that they were soon going to take up more space than the posts themselves. Thus, I organized and listed them here.

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